Shop

The photos of Deepti Asthana and also Fati Abubakar that have not been sold during the exhibitions are still on sale in this online shop.

CHF 380.-/Image, 40 x 60 cm, mounted on aluminium.

If you’re interested, please e-mail us at andererblick@gmail.com. Many Thanks

At the ghats of Omkareshwar, Madhya Pradesh women take a dip in the holy Narmada river.

In the special occasions like full moon, they have day long rituals where they take bathe, cook and eat by the river.

Shakila Husain, 75, weaves to make money for her living in Maheshwar, Madhya Pradesh. Her own son pushed her out of her home and she now lives alone close to her work place. Belonging from a conservative Muslim society, it was difficult for her to step out from her home and work, but she refused to go to an old age home and is now the senior most member of ‘Women weaver’ society. She encourages women from her community to educate their daughters and allow them to work; so that they never have to depend on anyone.

Sangeeta, 38, widow of Ashok lives with her two sons, in Vidarbha, Maharashtra. Her younger son is a sickle cell anemia patient and dropped out of school to support the family. Once known for its cotton or 'white gold’ production, Vidarbha now is notoriously known as the suicide belt of India. The region has been going through severe drought for the last ten years leading to almost 8,000 farmer suicide cases. So when a crisis-hit farmer kills himself, these widows are pushed further into more debt and are forced to take jobs as laborers on other farms to sustain.

Vaishnavi was only 5 when her father committed suicide. She now stays in a hostel in a relatively bigger village, as her mother can't afford to pay for her daily travel to school. While she misses being at home, she is determined to become a doctor and provide free health services to her village.

The younger generation is now distancing itself from agriculture after witnessing the pain of their fathers. With no crop insurance or a minimum support price, the farmers do not get a fair price for their crop, which piles up their debt year after year.

I photographed a nomad family of approximately 10 members traveling together to sell the iron stoves in Gujarat. It always amazes me the variety of jobs people do in India and they also make a decent living out of it. Making iron stoves is not new for them, it is being passed over the generations. There could be a time soon, when people stop using these iron stoves or called ‘Chulha’ when LPG reaches to every household, but I guess it is going to take a couple of more decades or more.

There could be a time soon, when people stop using these iron stoves or called ‘Chulha’ when LPG reaches to every household, but I guess it is going to take a couple of more decades or more.

I photographed a nomad family of approximately 10 members traveling together to sell the iron stoves in Gujarat. It always amazes me the variety of jobs people do in India and they also make a decent living out of it. Making iron stoves is not new for them, it is being passed over the generations. There could be a time soon, when people stop using these iron stoves or called ‘Chulha’ when LPG reaches to every household, but I guess it is going to take a couple of more decades or more.

There could be a time soon, when people stop using these iron stoves or called ‘Chulha’ when LPG reaches to every household, but I guess it is going to take a couple of more decades or more.

Nirmala has 4 younger sisters; unfortunately the desire of having a boy to her parents never came true.The father realized he can’t feed five daughters and gave away daughters to different relatives. Nirmala started to stay with her grandmother, and both of them rely on the income she makes running a small shop to sell seashells and toys. Grandmother is weak, so Nirmala often help her in setting the shop and collect the woods to cook.

Nirmala and Lakshmi share a special bond, which is beyond the limits of parenthood. They are the pillars of strength for each other. Nirmala is a shy kid and often don’t mingle with other children. She sits with her grandmother in the shop after the school. Lakshmi hardly gets time to leave the shop and cook; she fears losing the business, which is anyway very limited. Nirmala's lunch is taken care at the school under the government sponsered mid-day meal scheme. Niramala goes to see her parents once in six months or so; however she is not emotionally attached to her family. She is happy being with her grandmother. Nirmala is the eldest among four, the other three sisters are in Kilakari, Ramnathanpuram disrtict. Nirmala’s father gives a little money as when he comes to see the daughter; so Lakshmi takes care of all the expenses.

Nirmala has 4 younger sisters; unfortunately the desire of having a boy to her parents never came true.The father realized he can’t feed five daughters and gave away daughters to different relatives. Nirmala started to stay with her grandmother, and both of them rely on the income she makes running a small shop to sell seashells and toys. Grandmother is weak, so Nirmala often help her in setting the shop and collect the woods to cook.

Nirmala and Lakshmi share a special bond, which is beyond the limits of parenthood. They are the pillars of strength for each other. Nirmala is a shy kid and often don’t mingle with other children. She sits with her grandmother in the shop after the school. Lakshmi hardly gets time to leave the shop and cook; she fears losing the business, which is anyway very limited. Nirmala's lunch is taken care at the school under the government sponsered mid-day meal scheme. Niramala goes to see her parents once in six months or so; however she is not emotionally attached to her family. She is happy being with her grandmother. Nirmala is the eldest among four, the other three sisters are in Kilakari, Ramnathanpuram disrtict. Nirmala’s father gives a little money as when he comes to see the daughter; so Lakshmi takes care of all the expenses.

Nirmala has 4 younger sisters; unfortunately the desire of having a boy to her parents never came true.The father realized he can’t feed five daughters and gave away daughters to different relatives. Nirmala started to stay with her grandmother, and both of them rely on the income she makes running a small shop to sell seashells and toys. Grandmother is weak, so Nirmala often help her in setting the shop and collect the woods to cook.

Nirmala and Lakshmi share a special bond, which is beyond the limits of parenthood. They are the pillars of strength for each other. Nirmala is a shy kid and often don’t mingle with other children. She sits with her grandmother in the shop after the school. Lakshmi hardly gets time to leave the shop and cook; she fears losing the business, which is anyway very limited. Nirmala's lunch is taken care at the school under the government sponsered mid-day meal scheme. Niramala goes to see her parents once in six months or so; however she is not emotionally attached to her family. She is happy being with her grandmother. Nirmala is the eldest among four, the other three sisters are in Kilakari, Ramnathanpuram disrtict. Nirmala’s father gives a little money as when he comes to see the daughter; so Lakshmi takes care of all the expenses.

Veera, the woman on the photo is a fisherwoman from Diu. The first and foremost thing to notice about Koli women is their tattoos. For Koli women the tattoos are considered to be a mark of recognition by God. They believe that after death, at the gates of heaven, a woman is asked “do you bear the mark of God or are you sneaking in?”

In the deep desert of Rajasthan, the people still live in mud houses. The girls find the mud in the midst of vast mountains of sands. In one such village named Fuliya almost 30 kilometres away from India-Pakistan border, resources are minimal, and life is harsh specially for women. With limited opportunity of education, most of them are wedded as child. And soon they take up the responsibility of house hold work which consumes all of their time.

The government school started in Dhanushkodi about 10 years ago. Before that children had to walk almost 6 kilometer to catch a local bus to reach school at Rameswaram. There was no smooth connectivity and children had to wake up at 3 in the morning walk on the kaccha isolated road by the sea shore to reach school at 7 am and then do the 3-hour trek to reach home by 7 pm.

Sharanya was among a very few girls who completed her studies till 12th grade. Sharanya has been given a laptop by Government as a reward after completion of her studies, unfortunately there is no electricity here to charge the laptop and use it on a regular basis.

Dhanushkodi has been destroyed by a terrible cyclone in 1964. It has never been restored and is now a small village with fishermen living there.

The lack of money and employment leads to many other evils, such as child marriage among the seasonal immigrants. It is also a way of finding protection from the predators by declaring oneself as a married woman. Merely 16 years old Jyoti, is a child bride as well as a mother of 6-month old girl child. Over burdened by the responsibility of child as well as working as a daily laborer in the sugarcane farms of Gujarat, it is hard for her to be a loving mother or an efficient worker.

The seasonal migrants from Madhya Pradesh come to sugarcane farms of Gujarat at the end of the monsoon season, leaving their poorly irrigated land. In the sugarcane farms of Somnath, Gujarat, one element that stands out is the dark smoke coming out of the chimneys. While women work day in and day out to produce sugar, they are continually exposed to the smoke and pollution. All they can afford is a headscarf to save their hair from flakes and man’s shirt to save them from the heat. While profits continue to increase for owners, it’s the migrants that remain impoverished.

Manisha, 13, is from the same village of Chaukori. However, she belongs to a backward community, hence lives her life under social oppression, depriving her of schooling. She spends her day cooking, helping her mother in the fields, grazing cattle and collecting wood for fuel while coming back home. Life as a backward caste woman is especially difficult in the mountains. Sadly, these teenage girls are already treated like women; losing precious moments of childhood. After spending time with her for long, I wanted to photograph the child in her who perhaps is more connected to nature and still retains her innocence.

Skarma Chuksit is the youngest amongst all the nuns at Chattnyanling nunnery, Ladakh. When Skarma came to the nunnery in 2008, she was malnourished and too small for her age. She was suffering from rickets. Most of the young nuns arrive in Nunnerry in order to have the opportunities of education. And usually they belong to remote regions of Ladakh, where the families don’t have enough to feed all the children.

Ladakh, a northwestern region of Himalayas is a cold desert at the altitude of 4000 meters approximately. It had been isolated from the outside world until last few years. A predominately Buddhism land, Ladakh has numerous ancient monasteries but there were hardly any nunneries. They needed a safe place to live, worship and practice the Buddha Dharma; now there are total 22 nunneries in the region providing shelter and food.

Sisters Maryam and Fatima: ready for the Eid festivities in Maiduguri.

Feet of a schoolgirl decorated with henna tattoos.

A schoolgirl in an orphanage.

Aisha holds a photo of her husband in her hands. He was killed in the fight against Boko Haram. He worked as a civil servant and was a member of the citizen’s militia. During the terror crisis he assisted those in need by providing money and food as well as petrol for patrol vehicles. One fateful day, the people seeking assistance turned out to be Boko Haram terrorists in disguise. These imposters shot him in his living room.

A cattle herd in Konduga, a community close to Maiduguri. Herdsmen have frequently been the victims of attacks by members of Boko Haram who stole their cattle.

A traditional band plays during the Eid festivities in front of the palace of the Shehu of Borno, the traditional political and religious ruler of Borno state.

A young man from the Shuwa tribe arranges his headdress. After escaping from Boko Haran, the young men, most of whom are the sons of farmers, have difficulties finding employment and adjusting to life in Maiduguri. The city and the way of life of its inhabitants are foreign to them and many of the NGO-run aid programs are reserved for women and children. A further challenge arises from the fact that the residents of Maiduguri are wary of the young men, fearing that they may be Boko Haram terrorists in disguise.

Children sit in a burnt-out car in a refugee camp in Bama near a village that was destroyed by Boko Haram.

A traditionally-dressed tribal leader in royal regalia.

Naomi, a Gospel singer, poses for a portrait for her next album.

Due to insufficient security, sporting events in Borno state were cancelled for years. As the risk of terrorism has decreased, teams from other countries are starting to be flown in to participate in football matches. This photo shows the local football team El Kanemi shortly before a game – the first one in eight years.

A young man dressed up for the Eid festivities. Hip-hop fashion has made its way its way to Nigeria; Kanye West in Maiduguri! Each year there is a competition amidst the young men and boys to crown the best dressed and coolest.

A young man from the civilian’s militia at the market in Maiduguri. The market has been a frequent target of terrorist attacks. The terror of Boko Haram has unsettled many young people and motivated them to create their own civilian militias to protect the population of Maiduguri and the surrounding villages. At the moment, there are around 28,000 registered members of these types of militias in the state of Borno.

Morell, a well known R&B musician and rapper from Maiduguri, performs at an after-party following the official student graduation at the University of Maiduguri. These infamous parties were frequent occurrences in earlier years, but haven’t taken place in the last few years due to fears of attacks.